Friday, March 17, 2017

A REALLY Wanted Casino Cheat!

WANTED!
I have heard of some pretty prolific casino cheats, including myself, but I have NEVER seen one who's had his or her WANTED photo posted on the walls of post offices or on police and FBI websites before.

All this casino-cheat-law-enforcement hoopla is about Jubreal Chahine, a 40 year-old professional casino cheat who's been around casinos for some 15 years or so. His main casino-cheat gig has always been bet-capping and pastposting, at which he is pretty damned talented, but two years ago he was arrested in a Pennsylvania casino while applying for a Players Club card under his real name while he was wanted on outstanding casino-cheat-crime felony warrants.

How such a clever casino cheat could be so utterly stupid is a mystery to me!

Well, Chahine, also known as Alexander Gabriel Allen, is now wanted in Las Vegas for an assortment of criminal casino-cheat crimes, and the Clark County District Attorney's office has given him poster-boy status among casino cheats.

The photo above is now hanging on the walls of Clark County post offices and is on the website of various law-enforcement agencies.

Expect to see Mr. Chanine back behind bars soon.

Monday, March 13, 2017

Ivey and Sun Get New Life in UK Edge-Sorting Baccarat Scam Lawsuit

Infamous Baccarat Cheat Pair
It had appeared that Phil Ivey and his baccarat-cheat partner Cheng Yin Sun were running out of options in their lawsuit against Crockfords Casino in London to force the casino to pay them the $12 million they scammed from it back in 2012, but now the UK supreme court has granted the cheat-pair a final appeal, so Ivey and Sun are still not dead yet.

The UK lower courts have ruled that Crockfords does not have to pay Ivey and Sun their cheat profits, but they have never ruled that what the pair actually did constituted cheating. The reason why I call this cheating is because they altered the deal of the game in order to gain a material advantage against the casino, which in practically all casino jurisdictions is the very definition of cheating.

Ivey and Sun are in a similar situation in New Jersey with a lawsuit over the same edge-sorting which led to antoher huge casino baccarat win. Although this time the victim-casino, the Atlantic City Borgata, had already paid Ivey and Sun their $10 million and sucessfully sued to recover the money from them.

Ivey is still trying to win a final appeal in that case as well.

My take: I don't think the UK supreme court will reverse the lower courts' decisions--I sure hope they don't.

Thursday, March 09, 2017

A Real Law & Order Casino Cheat Case!

Most casino cheating cases that end up in court usually take little of the court's time. Normally it's an hour-or-two hearing and the judge makes his decision and slams his gavel.

But a very interesting baccarat-cheating case from Foxwoods Casino in Connecticut is making a lot of noise in a State Distict Court.

Back in 2014, a Chines couple and a Foxwoods baccarat dealer were charged with cheating Foxwoods out of $500,000 using the already infamous false-shuffling scam, which has the dealer faking the shuffle and preserving the order of the cards from the last shoe so that the players can know what the outcome of the upcoming deal will be.

The actual charges are cheating at gambling and first degree larceny.

The Chinese couple, Yan Wang (woman) and Bohen Zhang (man), rejected the state's plea offer of three years in prison followed by five years of probation, plus restitution. The Chinese dealer, George Zhu, was offered one year in prison followed by five years of probation, plus probation.

The plea-offers seem strange to me because the dealer or casino-employee in casino-cheat cases is usually given the stiffer sentence than his cohorts who took the money off the table. The state and casino usually want to punish the dishonest inside employee who sets up these casinuo-scams and puts them in motion. The cohors taking the money off the table usually are offered deals to testify against the dealer.

Well, in spite of all that, all three of them have decided to fight the case in court rather than accept the pleas. They each are risking as much as 25 years in state prison.

My take: Who said the Chinese aren't gamblers!

Friday, March 03, 2017

Insider Craps-Dealer Cheat Scam Stings Louisiana Casino

Cheating Craps Dealer
This time the insider-dealer-cheat scam happened at the craps table. It was kind of rank and not for the biggest ill-gotten casino-cheat fortune we've seen, but nevertheless 49-year-old Treasure Chest Casino Craps dealer Anthony Thompson was allegedly passing off chips to two cohort patrons on his craps tables over a seven-day period. By "passing off," I mean just that. He was not allowing late or pastposted bets, but simply giving chips to his craps-cheat partners at what he considered the most opportune times, most likely when supervisors weren't watching his games or boxmen were absent.

Eventually a video review of one table game caught the craps-cheating act, and then other videos going back a week revealed several repetitions of the passing-off-chips scam.

Police were called in to interrogate Thompson, who was subsequently placed under arrest and charged wtih several felonies including theft, cheating, swindling and conspiracy.

My take: This is a prime example of someone throwing out an entire casino career for not much more than a bag of peanuts. If he had two partners during this seven-day cheat-episode and they were equal three-way partners, Thompson's take would have been a mere $500. And even if the scam  had gone on for several weeks before that (casino videos are usually erased after a seven-day period), maybe he made a few grand.

But now he'll never work in a casino again, will have a criminal record and maybe even serve some prison time.

Wednesday, February 22, 2017

BetOnline Responds to Live Online Blackjack Cheating Charge

Did he or didn't he Cheat?
Ever since the BetOnline blackjack-cheating incident his Youtube a few days ago, tens of thousands of people, everyone from bloggers to online blackjack players to online blackjack cheats to the plain old curious, have been talking about it, analyzing whether or not actual online-casino-sponsored-cheating did take place.

Under tons of pressure to respond, BetOnline finally did. Read that response here and then come back to this page and read my take on it.

My take: It doesn't really seem that BetOnline admitted any cheating but rather emitted the usual phraseology about upgrading its feed and its dedication to maintaining the integrity of online casino gaming on their site.

Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Live Online Blackjack Dealer Caught Cheating?

Proof of Live Online Blackjack Cheating?
Don't be surprised! It's not the first time.

Two years ago a live online roulette dealer was caught simply placing the ball on the winning number without even spinning it!

As the live online tables are usually off to the side of the busy main casino, sometimes the inspectors charged with supervising them just forget about them, leaving the dealers free to do more or less what they please.

And if that dealer is dishonest, the consequences can be huge for the casino.

This time the evidence of the live online casino cheating incident appeared on Youtube. The live feed came from Global Gaming Labs of Costa Rica, which is used by several online casinos. Professional blackjack player Michael Morgenstern was reportedly playing online blackjack at BetOnline when he recorded the incident.

It seems that the dealer on the video is actually dealing a second card and not the top card, which is a flaming cheat move that has been around for centuries.

But the result of this second-deal move is puzzling. It resulted in the player losing and the casino winning the hand. Had the move not been performed, the player would have won the hand. This begs the obvious question: why is the dealer cheating for the casino? Normally dealers participate in cheat-scams to aid a player or players he's in cahoots with, and then they split up the profits.

It's hard to believe an online casino would partner-up with a dealer to cheat players when they already have an unbeatable online edge.

When I get more info on this I will certainly pass it along.

To see the video go here.

Monday, February 13, 2017

Professional Card-Switcher on Rampage through Washington State Pai Gow Tables

Washington St. Pai Gow Tables Inviting Cheats?
Though as yet unidentified, the alleged Pai Gow card-switching cheat is an aerospace engineer!

Hard to connect the aerospace industry with casino cheating, but maybe the guy had a gambling problem. I would be willing to wager that he is Chinese, though.

According to reports, the man was arrested and charged with thirteen counts of what they're calling second-degree cheating and five counts of misdemeanor theft. This IMMEDIATELY caught my eye. Firstly, I never heard of second-degree casino cheating. In just about every casino jurisdiction in the US, any casino cheating, regardless of the amount of money involved, is a felony. Even if it's for one dollar. And the $6,000 the card-switching cheat allegedly earned is being treated as misdemeanor theft!

My take: Well, it's simple. I would advise all you casino cheats out there to head out to Washington State! If your only risk at cheating attempts for serious money is being charged with misdemeanors, whata have you got to lose?

Chinese Dealer and Patron Team-Up for New Insider Casino Cheat Scam in British Columbia Casino

B.C. Dealer Cheat Scam
The details of what cheating incident actually occurred last November at the Lake City Casino have not been released but it happened at the roulette wheel. Twenty-one year-old roulette dealer Yun Long Yang and twenty-five year-old roulette player Mingzhe Xuwere arrested after an investigation by Canadian gaming authorities. Apparently the casino was tipped off by another dealer and began watching Yang at several roulette tables where they noticed that Xu was following him to each table.

Dealers being followed to respective tables by players is oftentimes a sign of a collusion cheating scam between dealer and player, although sometimes players like to follow a dealer who has been lucky for them on previous tables.

I do not yet have details of what the roulette cheat scam was, but I imagine it was something simple involving the dealer moving the player's chips onto winning numbers while marking them with the dolly or just simply paying out chips when supervisors weren't looking.

As soon as I have more on this, I will pass it along.

My take: Even though my own twenty-five-year professional cheating career began with an inside dealer collusion scam, I generally don't favor them--unless, of course, I am the dealer!

Thursday, February 09, 2017

Russian Smart Phone Slot Machine International Cheat Scam Widens

Russian Smart Phone Slot Scam
We first heard about the ingenius Russian Cell Phone Slot scams back in 2014 as it was deployed in Singapore's casinos.  Bit since then there has been evidence of its use in casinos worldwide, especially in the midwest United States.

To see all the details about the scam, read this article

My take: The main reason this Russian slot machine scam is so good, besides the obvious high-tech mastery and deception, is that the slot cheats operating it have shown themselves not to be too greedy. They are taking down relatively small wins and not the huge jackpots that draw too much attention. The band of Russian cheats typically enter a casino and take out a few grand a shot, but when they do this continually and have thousands of casinos to choose from, they get into the millions and even tens of millions very quickly.

Tuesday, February 07, 2017

Is this a Bungled Attempt at Pulling off my Famed Savannah Roulette Cheat Move?

Me demonstrating the Savannah
First, read this news account of what the aspiring cheat did.

Then tell me what you think. Is it an attempt as Savannah or not? And if you think it is, please tell me why you think it was good or bad or ridiculously bad.

My thought is, if I understand correctly what the guy was doing, is how could he sit there with his hands covering the bet the whole time the ball was spinning? How could the dealer or a floor person standing nearby not notice this?

And then, why didn't he just DO the Savannah correctly if his awkward move was indeed inspired by it? I mean, loads of people are out there still doing this incredible move with lots of success.

The bottom line is I'd bet this guy was indeed doing his version, albeit ridiculous, of my Savannah.