Friday, September 22, 2017

Bizarre Tail of Casino-Cheating-Robbery aboard Cruise Ship while docked in Greece.

Cruise Casino-Cheat Lawyer? 
The online news account posted by a maritime lawyer reports that two Bulgarian men aboard an unnamed cruise ship won over a million dollars in the ship's casino and were later robbed of much of that money by two cruise ship officers, who then said that the Bulgarians cheated to gain the money and they were simply recovering the ill-gotten gains for the cruise line, which is not identified either.

Sounds like a bad movie, right?

Local Greek police supposedly arrested the two cruise ship officers, who claimed they committed no crime.

My first question is: Did this really happen?

My second is: Why is this being reported by Jim Walker, a partner in the maritime law firm Walker and O'neill based in Miami? Perhaps it is just a ploy to gain some business.

But what I am really wondering is whether or not this happened?

If it really did, it is a major story...and I would sure love to know how two guys cheated a cruise ship casino out of more than a million bucks! Cruise ships are not generally known for even legitimate action that could result in such winnings, besides maybe slot jackpots.

So if anyone out there can enlighten me about this story, please do!

Monday, September 18, 2017

New Novel Lauches Casino-Cheat Main Plot!

New Casino-Cheat Novel
I have always thought that casino-cheating would be a good backdrop if not a main plot for literary thrillers, and now one has finally hit the bookstores.

It is called "His Just Desserts" and the author is John Raymond Williams, whom I imagine has an intricate knowledge of both casino-cheating and casino surveillance.

I wonder if he has ever participated in cheating casinos himself? Ummm....

In any case, go here to read the plot. For me it is a must-read!

Want to Convert Forgery Proceeds into Cash via Casino Chips?....

Found way for Marina Bay Sands to help
Just go to Marina Bay Sands Casino in Singapore.

As just about any casino and non-casino fraud in Singapore somehow ends up at Singapore's Marina Bay Sands casino in Singapore, why not use it to convert your illicit fraudulent gains into cash via that casino's gaming chips?

Apparently it has already been done.

Mr.Reichie Chng Teck Kian, a 51 year-old former grassroots volunteer from his congressional constituency in Singapore and now a cabdriver, allegedly pulled off a fraudulent investment scheme against twelve people by using WhatsApp and screenshots to create a false electronic history of his dealings with well-to-do business people throughout Asia. He then convinced his victims to invest with him in various business and property schemes.

The total amount of his fraud was in excess of a million dollars.

So when he had the problem of washing the proceeds, he turned to the criminal haven known as the Marina Bay Sands casino. I don't know why but he turned his criminal proceeds into casino chips and then probably back into cash.

According to court documents, Kian has made more than $50,000 in restitution, but still faces up to 10 years in prison.

My take: Well, if you can't figure out a way to casino-cheat the Marina Bay Sands, it is always there to help you launder your money from whatever criminal enterprise.

Friday, September 08, 2017

Can we believe any of these "Advantage Play Experts" out there?

The short answer is yes...but that answer is very short, because as far as I'm concerned, there is only one real Advantage Play expert out there, and his name is Eliot Jacobson.

The real AP expert!
This self-professed ex-mediocre advantage player is quite more than mediocre when it comes to analyzing advantage play methods and techniques, both for prospective players and casinos looking for advice on how to make their gaming tables less vulnerable to advantage play. Jacobson has for many years thoroughly examined everything advantage play from simple card-counting to Phil Ivey's monster edge-sorting baccarat scam.

He has written it all in a superb book called "Advanced Advantage Play."

Although I have some differences of opinion with him, one of such being Jacobson's assertion that Phil Ivey's edge-sorting tactics amount to advantage play and not cheating (for me edge-sorting is as much cheating as any other cheat move if the dealers' procedural methods are altered in any way by the player to gain an edge), I have the utmost respect for Eliot Jacobson for his truly in-depth and accurate analysis of anything advantage-play related that comes across his desk--even if his videos are interrupted by an occasional invited guest--mainly his dog!

Wednesday, September 06, 2017

Woman Casino Cheat gets a year in jail for colluding with Blackjack Dealer in Chip-dumping scheme

More Casino Cheating
It happened at the Mohegan Sun in Connecticut, a hotbed of all forms of casino cheating, some with the help of crooked dealers, others by casino cheats acting by themselves. This one included a crooked dealer, who simply dumped excess chips on his female cohort's winning hands.

They worked the blackjack scam on several occasions--and made a hefty $78,000 profit from the casino. It is not surprising that such a low-level and amateurish scam could make so much money at the Mohegan Sun. Scams like this have been successfully pulled off there time and again.

Thirty-eight year-old Marlene Rivera, who suffered from substance abuse, allegedly convinced her dealer friend Roy Mariano to perpetrate the blackjack cheating episodes. Mariano told investigators that he agreed to participate because he was upset that his working hours at the casino had been reduced. However, he has pleaded not guilty to the crime and is awaiting trial.

Rivera, on the other hand, pleaded guilty to first degree larceny and could have been sentenced to three years in prison. She told the court that she has been undergoing counseling to help with her substance abuse problems.

My take: It amazes me that it doesn't amaze me how these ridiculous scams net so much money before being caught.

Friday, August 25, 2017

Trio of Dice-Sliders Cheat Louisiana Casino for $56,000. One arrested, Two on the lam.

One die doesn't tumble or hit the back wall
Dice-Sliding Casino Cheat Scams are getting more and more popular these days, and I have trouble understanding why casinos are having so much trouble stopping them.

A trio of Filipinos, Allan Arana, Lim R. Tan and Jaime Iglesias, hit the Baton Rouge casino on August 9th. Thirty-five year old Arana was the dice-slider while his two partners were the big betters. After hitting the Louisiana casino, Arana was arrested in a Natchez, Mississippi casino after being caught dice-sliding again. He was shortly released by Mississippi gaming authorities and then headed directly to the New Orleans airport, probably to get the first plane back to the Philippines.

It is not clear if Tan and Iglesias were with Arana at the Mississippi casino. Arrest warrants have been
issued for both.

Dice-Sliding is simply sliding the dice instead of rolling them. In that fashion they don't tumble so the shooter sets up one or both dice in order to attain the winning numbers on various bets. Usually one or more craps players create lively conversation with the dealers and other diversions to get their attention away from the dice-slider, who then slides at least one of the dice instead of rolling it.  A good slider can imitate a legitimate tumble of the dice but the one thing he cannot do is "imitate" both dice from hitting the back wall and tumbling, which all but nullifies the set-up position of one or two dice.

And that's all casinos have to do to stamp out dice-sliding. Just make sure the dice tumble and hit the back wall!

Friday, August 18, 2017

Genting Casino Scotland investigating $250,000 Baccarat Cheat Scam

Another Genting Baccarat Cheat Scam
Funny thing, Genting Group which operates several casinos in the UK and Asia, has again been victimized by what its senior executives say is another baccarat cheat scam. The funny thing is that Genting Group is the owner of Crockford's casino in London, the gaming establishment that brought the whole Phil Ivey baccarat edge-sorting cheat scam to light back in 2012. Ivey was accused of cheating Crockfords out of $12 million.

In this latest case, Genting Group says that a cheating gang hit its Glasgow casino's baccarat tables several times over a four month period and beat them for a cool quarter million. Now details of how the alleged scam was carried out, but it appears to involve distracting tactics and maybe even inside dealer-collusion enabling the cheats to identify the value of the cards before they were dealt.

No mention of edge-sorting has been made. When I get more info on this I will pass it along.

Does demanding to see called poker hands at showdown give unfair advantage to some poker players?

Secrets in the muck?
All poker players have been annoyed at one time or another when other players demand to see their hands after a call when they are thrown into the muck. The accepted explanation for this is that it helps to identify collusion at the table.

But does it? And does it somehow favor certain players over others?

Here's a pretty good article on the subject.

My North Korean Poker-Hacking Claims Backed up by other News Articles

Online Poker Hacking for Nukes?
Back in mid-May I wrote an article about my suspicions that Kim Jong Un, the nuclear-bluffing North Korean dictator, may not at all be a bluffer when it comes to hacking online poker sites. My reasoning, of course, was that hacking online poker games was another profitable source of income to finance the North Korean nuclear weapons program.

Now serveral other news articles about Kim's poker-hacking program, as I shall call it, are surfacing online. And I highly doubt that any of these articles contain fake news. They're coming from official South Korean security agencies.

Here's one article about Kim Jong Un hacking online poker. Have a read and let me know what you think.

Monday, August 14, 2017

Guy REALLY gets cheated out of $100,000 casino slot machine jackpot!

Sugar Daddy got screwed...
Imagine this situation: You're with your girlfriend/boyfriend having a great time at a casino playing a slot machine with a progressive jackpot. You're the one gambling because the money being pumped into the machine at fifty bucks a pop is coming off your casino slot player's card. So while the machine is registering the monies off your card, you're smooching with your companion and you say to him/her, "You go ahead and press the button to bring me good luck." He/she presses the button and...WHAM! Bells start ringing and the slot machine screen goes berserk!
by this Russian hottie

YOU WON! A HUNDRED GRAND!

You got back all the money you lost at slot machines your entire life and then some!

Then suddenly your companion goes running off to alert casino personnel to the your win, crying hysterically out loud,"I won! I won!"

At first you don't think much of the fact that he/she said "I won!" and not "We won!" You think that he/she was simply overwhelmed by the moment, and of course you, not he/she/, would be receiving the big hundred-grand check from the casino.

WRONG!

He/she gets the check because he/she is the person who actually pressed the button on the machine. Casino law states that the person who presses the button or pulls the arm of a slot machine is the rightful winner of the jackpot, regardless of who puts the money in the machine before the button is pressed or the arm is pulled.

So if you have a bitch/asshole companion who is a greedy son of a bitch/asshole who doesn't want to give you the jackpot or at least split it with you, you're shit out of luck.

Imagine that!

Well, you might have guessed that since I'm writing this, the event depicted here actually did happen.

Yes, it did.

In April of this year at the Seminole Hard Rock casino in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, 66-year-old Jan Flato was sitting at the slot machine with his hot young Russian girlfriend, Marina Medvedeva (who is married to a guy whose last name is Navarro), when he inserted his player's card into the machine and told her to press the button for good luck.

She did, and the reels came up $100,000!

She claimed the jackpot, gave him jack shit, after which he appeared to threaten her in text messages and she played the nice innocent little girl, as if she wasn't out hustling the guy in the first place.

Well, what would you do if this happened to you?

I know what I would do!